New Gallery exhibition celebrates student fashion at UNC

The North Carolina Collection Gallery has a new exhibit — From Frock Coats to Flip-Flops: 100 Years of Fashion at Carolina — open through June 5, 2016.

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While these two pieces have fifty years between them, they share the same Carolina spirit. The sweater is from the 1920s, and the overalls are from the early 1980s. Both were worn to sporting events during their time.

The exhibition focuses on the years 1900 to 1999, although the oldest pieces of clothing come from 1892. Come see what a frock coat, Earth Shoes, and flannel can teach us about the social history of the 20th century.

 

Doors at Dix Hospital Opened, 1856

Source: Doors at Dix Hospital Opened, 1856

The main building on the Dix campus, circa 1940. Image from the State Archives.

On February 22, 1856, the new “Insane Hospital of North Carolina”—renamed Dorothea Dix Hospital a century later—admitted its first patient, suffering from “suicidal mania.” Previously, families kept mentally ill members at home or local governments confined them in jails or poorhouses.

Nationwide social reforms during the 1830s and 1840s sparked interest in state-run hospitals for the medical treatment of mentally ill patients. In 1848, mental health crusader Dorothea Dix travelled to North Carolina from Massachusetts and personally lobbied legislators for an asylum.

Read the rest at NC History Today.

 

Princeville, First Black Town, Incorporated 1885

Source: Princeville, First Black Town, Incorporated 1885

The Mayor Orren James Groceries in downtown Princeville. Image from the State Archives.

The Mayor Orren James Groceries in downtown Princeville. Image from the State Archives.

On February 20, 1885, 22 years after Emancipation, freedmen in Edgecombe County incorporated Princeville, the state’s first black town.

Its claim to first in the nation is rivalled only by Eatonville, Florida. Along with James City in Craven County and Roanoke Island in Dare County, the community was among the state’s three resettlement colonies for former slaves.

At the close of the Civil War, Union troops occupied the Tarboro area. Former slaves in surrounding counties left their plantations and flocked to the Federal encampment seeking freedom and protection. The future faced by the mostly illiterate, unskilled and penniless freedmen was uncertain and bleak.

Princeville Highway Marker

Read the rest here: Princeville, First Black Town, Incorporated 1885

 

State Endorses Female Higher Education, 1891

Source: State Endorses Female Higher Education, 1891

The Main Building and Brick Dormitory at UNC Greensboro, circa 1892. Image from UNC-Greensboro Libraries.

The Main Building and Brick Dormitory at UNC Greensboro, circa 1892. Image from UNC-Greensboro Libraries.

On February 18, 1891, the State Normal and Industrial School—now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro—was chartered.

First established as a school for female teachers, it became the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina in 1932, joining the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State College as part of the Consolidated University System. Becoming coeducational in 1963, the college was renamed the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

A group of five UNC Greensboro students pose for a picture in the 1890s. Image from UNC-Greensboro Libraries.

A group of five UNC Greensboro students pose for a picture in the 1890s. Image from UNC-Greensboro Libraries.

The State Normal School was built on 10 acres in western Greensboro in Guilford County. It opened in October 1892 with 223 students and 15 faculty members. Originally, the school offered degrees in three departments: education, domestic sciences and business.

Read more at: State Endorses Female Higher Education, 1891

John Hope Franklin makes front-page news

Source: John Hope Franklin makes front-page news

John Hope Franklin makes front-page news

60 years ago today: Front-page headline in the New York Times: “Negro Educator Chosen to Head Department at Brooklyn College. Howard University Professor Will be First of Race to Hold That Rank Here.”

John Hope Franklin‘s appointment marks the first time an African-American has been appointed chairman of any department at a traditionally white institution.

According to the Times, “[Franklin’s] greatest research ambition is…  an explanation of the South’s inclination to belligerency and emotionalism.”

In 1982 Franklin will return to North Carolina, where he authored the classic “From Slavery to Freedom” and taught at St. Augustine’s College and North Carolina College for Negroes, to become James B. Duke professor of history at Duke University.